Design for the Community

Connecting to our communities is a fundamental commitment of everyone at SSFM. Our people chose to engage in many ways. Lulu Chun, a planner in our Strategic Services Group, recently had the opportunity to give back to her alma mater, the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Hawaii. Alumni of the Department now have a newly formed chapter of the UH Alumni Association, the DURP Ohana.

Along with her credentials as a planner, landscape architect and urban planner, Lulu has a keen interest in graphic design. Lulu volunteered to design the Chapter’s new identity. “The Hawaiian Islands are unlike any environment on the planet and the logo needed to explicitly say Hawaii,” says Lulu. She chose the taro leaf as the focal visual.

April 2018

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The Taro’s Story

Taro is a staple of the Native Hawaiian diet and at the core of the Hawaiian culture. It is one of the best known, important, and reliable plants in all of Polynesia. Hawaiians take a deep pride in its profound history and consider it sacred. Various names for parts of the taro plant indicate its interwoven history with the Hawaiian people: the place where the stem meets the leaf is called the piko, or navel. The stem is the ha, the breath, and the cluster of shoots (or keiki, meaning children) that surround the mother plant are called an ohana, or family. The imagery of the taro’s broad and beautiful heart shaped leaf was a perfect visual metaphor for the Chapter’s identity.

For Lulu, the taro leaf was the embodiment of Hawaii’s sense of place. The orientation and color patterns of her taro leaf represents the unique system of environments Hawaii planners work in: ranging from mauka open space and agricultural lands, to developed urban areas, to expanses of coastline. Her logo embodies the complex and diverse situations planners must be prepared for in Hawaii. Lulu sculpted the shape of the leaf’s top edge to reflect the Island’s mountain ranges.

Lulu was welcomed as an intern at SSFM while pursuing her Master’s and joined the firm upon her graduation. As part of the Strategic Services Group, Lulu is engaged in Honolulu’s Complete Streets programs, utilizing her design skills to create easy-to-understand mobility plans.

Design for the Community

Connecting to our communities is a fundamental commitment of everyone at SSFM. Our people chose to engage in many ways. Lulu Chun, a planner in our Strategic Services Group, recently had the opportunity to give back to her alma mater, the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Hawaii. Alumni of the Department now have a newly formed chapter of the UH Alumni Association, the DURP Ohana.

Along with her credentials as a planner, landscape architect and urban planner, Lulu has a keen interest in graphic design. Lulu volunteered to design the Chapter’s new identity. “The Hawaiian Islands are unlike any environment on the planet and the logo needed to explicitly say Hawaii,” says Lulu. She chose the taro leaf as the focal visual.

April 2018

More / Less

The Taro’s Story

Taro is a staple of the Native Hawaiian diet and at the core of the Hawaiian culture. It is one of the best known, important, and reliable plants in all of Polynesia. Hawaiians take a deep pride in its profound history and consider it sacred. Various names for parts of the taro plant indicate its interwoven history with the Hawaiian people: the place where the stem meets the leaf is called the piko, or navel. The stem is the ha, the breath, and the cluster of shoots (or keiki, meaning children) that surround the mother plant are called an ohana, or family. The imagery of the taro’s broad and beautiful heart shaped leaf was a perfect visual metaphor for the Chapter’s identity.

For Lulu, the taro leaf was the embodiment of Hawaii’s sense of place. The orientation and color patterns of her taro leaf represents the unique system of environments Hawaii planners work in: ranging from mauka open space and agricultural lands, to developed urban areas, to expanses of coastline. Her logo embodies the complex and diverse situations planners must be prepared for in Hawaii. Lulu sculpted the shape of the leaf’s top edge to reflect the Island’s mountain ranges.

Lulu was welcomed as an intern at SSFM while pursuing her Master’s and joined the firm upon her graduation. As part of the Strategic Services Group, Lulu is engaged in Honolulu’s Complete Streets programs, utilizing her design skills to create easy-to-understand mobility plans.